Creating Curriculum for Sustainable Business: An Indigenous Perspective

November 28, 2011 by Dr. Grace Ann Rosile, Associate Professor, Department of Management via email

Dr. Gregory Cajete, Native American Studies Chair, and Associate Prof. of Education at the University of New Mexico

Dr. Gregory Cajete, Native American Studies Chair, and Associate Prof. of Education at the University of New Mexico

Seminar: Dr. Gregory Cajeta

Thursday, Dec. 1, 2:35-4:30pm in Hardman Hall, Room 216: College of Business Research Seminar Series

This week, we are most pleased to welcome Dr. Gregory Cajete to our campus. His work is so well-known and so important to our understanding of indigenous science, ecology, and community. We invite you to come to his presentation on Thursday, Dec 1, 2011 (room to be announced in follow-up email, or call Joe Gladstone at 575-993-8035 or email joeg@nmsu.edu or joe.gladstone@vtext.com if you can’t find the location).

In this seminar, Dr. Cajete will explore the ways in which indigenous thought can inform and otherwise be integrated into the development of “new” curricula in business ethics and social business themes presented in schools of business. Because indigenous thought is a reflection of interdependence, community and sustainability, how these characteristics can be incorporated into current business school curricula will form the basis for seminar discussions.

Dr. Cajete is a Native American educator whose work is dedicated to honoring the foundations of indigenous knowledge in education. He is a Tewa Indian from Santa Clara Pueblo, New Mexico. He has lectured at colleges and universities in the U.S., Canada, Mexico, New Zealand, England, Italy, Japan and Russia. He has authored and/or edited numerous books. “Look to the Mountain” and “Native Science” are often-cited foundational works in his field.

Note: This visit is supported by College of Business Faculty Development funds. We thank them for this opportunity.


Greg Cajete, Ph.D., (Santa Clara Pueblo), NAS Chair, Associate Professor Education

Bio, November 28, 2011. Retrieved online from http://www.unm.edu/~nasinfo/faculty.html#cajete

Gregory Cajete, Native American educator whose work is dedicated to honoring the foundations of indigenous knowledge in education. Dr. Cajete is a Tewa Indian from Santa Clara Pueblo, New Mexico. He has served as a New Mexico Humanities scholar in ethno-botany of Northern New Mexico and as a member of the New Mexico Arts Commission. In addition, he has lectured at colleges and universities in the U.S., Canada, Mexico, New Zealand, England, Italy, Japan and Russia.

He worked at the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico for 21 years. While at the Institute, he served as Dean of the Center for Research and Cultural Exchange, Chair of Native American Studies and Professor of ethno-science. He organized and directed the First and Second Annual National Native American Very Special Arts Festival held in respectively in Santa Fe, NM, in 1991 and Albuquerque, NM, in 1992. In 1995, he was offered a position in American Indian education in the University of New Mexico, College of Education.

Currently, he is Director of Native American Studies and an Associate Professor in the Division of Language, Literacy and Socio-cultural Studies in the College of Education at the University of New Mexico. Dr. Cajete earned his Bachelor of Arts degree from New Mexico Highlands University with majors in both Biology and Sociology and a minor in Secondary Education. He received his Masters of Arts degree from the University of New Mexico in Adult and Secondary Education. He received his Ph.D. from International College-Los Angeles New Philosophy Program in Social Science Education with an emphasis in Native American Studies.

Dr. Cajete has received several fellowships and academic distinctions, including the American Indian Graduate Fellowship from the US-DOE Office of Indian Education (1977-78); the D’arcy McNickle Fellowship in American Indian History from the Newberry Library, Chicago, IL (1984-85); and the Katrin Lamon Fellowship in American Indian Art and Education (1985-1986) from the School of American Research in Santa Fe, NM.

Dr. Cajete also designs culturally-responsive curricula geared to the special needs and learning styles of Native American students. These curricula are based upon Native American understanding of the “nature of nature” and utilize this foundation to develop an understanding of the science and artistic thought process as expressed in indigenous perspectives of the natural world.

Dr. Cajete has authored five books: “Look to the Mountain: An Ecology of Indigenous Education,” Kivaki Press, 1994; “Ignite the Sparkle: An Indigenous Science Education Curriculum Model,” Kivaki Press, 1999; “Spirit of the Game: Indigenous Wellsprings, 2004;” “A People’s Ecology: Explorations in Sustainable Living,” and “Native Science: Natural Laws of Interdependence,” Clearlight Publishers, 1999 and 2000.


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